Investigative journalist Stevie Cameron, who wrote about serial killer Robert William Pickton and his victims in On the Farm, talked to the Globe and Mail about the release of Commissioner Wally Oppal’s final report, set for Monday, December 17. Cameron was photographed Friday, December 14, 2012. (Galit Rodan for tthe Globe and Mail)
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/stevie-cameron-there-are-lots-of-mr-picktons-around/article6463041/?cmpid=rss1 Investigative journalist Stevie Cameron, who wrote about serial killer Robert William Pickton and his victims in On the Farm, talked to the Globe and Mail about the release of Commissioner Wally Oppal’s final report, set for Monday, December 17. Cameron was photographed Friday, December 14, 2012. (Galit Rodan for tthe Globe and Mail)
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/stevie-cameron-there-are-lots-of-mr-picktons-around/article6463041/?cmpid=rss1

Investigative journalist Stevie Cameron, who wrote about serial killer Robert William Pickton and his victims in On the Farm, talked to the Globe and Mail about the release of Commissioner Wally Oppal’s final report, set for Monday, December 17. Cameron was photographed Friday, December 14, 2012. (Galit Rodan for tthe Globe and Mail)

Link: 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/stevie-cameron-there-are-lots-of-mr-picktons-around/article6463041/?cmpid=rss1

Skaters took to the ice at Nathan Phillips Square despite rain and warm temperatures, Sunday, December 2, 2012. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail). Skaters took to the ice at Nathan Phillips Square despite rain and warm temperatures, Sunday, December 2, 2012. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail). Skaters took to the ice at Nathan Phillips Square despite rain and warm temperatures, Sunday, December 2, 2012. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail). Skaters took to the ice at Nathan Phillips Square despite rain and warm temperatures, Sunday, December 2, 2012. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail). Skaters took to the ice at Nathan Phillips Square despite rain and warm temperatures, Sunday, December 2, 2012. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail). Skaters took to the ice at Nathan Phillips Square despite rain and warm temperatures, Sunday, December 2, 2012. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail).

Skaters took to the ice at Nathan Phillips Square despite rain and warm temperatures, Sunday, December 2, 2012. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail).

Actress Sally Field was in Toronto promoting her new movie, Lincoln, Thursday, November 5, 2012. Field plays Mary Todd Lincoln in the Spielberg drama, set for release this month. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail).
Copyright Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/the-role-that-still-haunts-sally-field/article5365905/ Actress Sally Field was in Toronto promoting her new movie, Lincoln, Thursday, November 5, 2012. Field plays Mary Todd Lincoln in the Spielberg drama, set for release this month. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail).
Copyright Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/the-role-that-still-haunts-sally-field/article5365905/ Actress Sally Field was in Toronto promoting her new movie, Lincoln, Thursday, November 5, 2012. Field plays Mary Todd Lincoln in the Spielberg drama, set for release this month. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail).
Copyright Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/the-role-that-still-haunts-sally-field/article5365905/

Actress Sally Field was in Toronto promoting her new movie, Lincoln, Thursday, November 5, 2012. Field plays Mary Todd Lincoln in the Spielberg drama, set for release this month. (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail).

Copyright Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail

Link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/the-role-that-still-haunts-sally-field/article5365905/

On Thursday evening I went to Cabbagetown to cover a vigil for Nighisti Semret for the Globe. I have covered a few vigils now, sadly, and have come to have some idea of what to expect. There are always flowers and candles, for example. But normally there are also family members that become the centre of attention. Nighisti Semret was a refugee from Eritrea and lived here alone, working to send money back to her family now living in Uganda. A few of the first articles I read quoted neighbours saying she was quiet and kept to herself. I wondered whether the vigil would also be a quiet affair. 
It was not. It was, in fact, probably the most emotional vigil I have been to. There was a very audible outpouring of grief from many of the women - neighbours - who came to pay their respects. Some of them were also from Eritrea. They lamented the way she died, and the fact that she had had to live here alone for two years. They recognized themselves in her. 
One of my least favourite things to do as a photographer is stick my camera in the face of someone who is grieving. Yet as I tried to manoeuvre my way around the packed alleyway, people stepped aside to let me through. I probably said ‘sorry’ about 1,000 times - every time I felt I was in someone’s way. But I got the distinct sense that the mourners really wanted this vigil covered. And I was touched, as I often am, that they let me into their lives for a little while. 
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/victim-of-cabbagetown-stabbing-dreamed-of-bringing-kids-to-canada-coworkers-say/article4651476/ On Thursday evening I went to Cabbagetown to cover a vigil for Nighisti Semret for the Globe. I have covered a few vigils now, sadly, and have come to have some idea of what to expect. There are always flowers and candles, for example. But normally there are also family members that become the centre of attention. Nighisti Semret was a refugee from Eritrea and lived here alone, working to send money back to her family now living in Uganda. A few of the first articles I read quoted neighbours saying she was quiet and kept to herself. I wondered whether the vigil would also be a quiet affair. 
It was not. It was, in fact, probably the most emotional vigil I have been to. There was a very audible outpouring of grief from many of the women - neighbours - who came to pay their respects. Some of them were also from Eritrea. They lamented the way she died, and the fact that she had had to live here alone for two years. They recognized themselves in her. 
One of my least favourite things to do as a photographer is stick my camera in the face of someone who is grieving. Yet as I tried to manoeuvre my way around the packed alleyway, people stepped aside to let me through. I probably said ‘sorry’ about 1,000 times - every time I felt I was in someone’s way. But I got the distinct sense that the mourners really wanted this vigil covered. And I was touched, as I often am, that they let me into their lives for a little while. 
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/victim-of-cabbagetown-stabbing-dreamed-of-bringing-kids-to-canada-coworkers-say/article4651476/ On Thursday evening I went to Cabbagetown to cover a vigil for Nighisti Semret for the Globe. I have covered a few vigils now, sadly, and have come to have some idea of what to expect. There are always flowers and candles, for example. But normally there are also family members that become the centre of attention. Nighisti Semret was a refugee from Eritrea and lived here alone, working to send money back to her family now living in Uganda. A few of the first articles I read quoted neighbours saying she was quiet and kept to herself. I wondered whether the vigil would also be a quiet affair. 
It was not. It was, in fact, probably the most emotional vigil I have been to. There was a very audible outpouring of grief from many of the women - neighbours - who came to pay their respects. Some of them were also from Eritrea. They lamented the way she died, and the fact that she had had to live here alone for two years. They recognized themselves in her. 
One of my least favourite things to do as a photographer is stick my camera in the face of someone who is grieving. Yet as I tried to manoeuvre my way around the packed alleyway, people stepped aside to let me through. I probably said ‘sorry’ about 1,000 times - every time I felt I was in someone’s way. But I got the distinct sense that the mourners really wanted this vigil covered. And I was touched, as I often am, that they let me into their lives for a little while. 
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/victim-of-cabbagetown-stabbing-dreamed-of-bringing-kids-to-canada-coworkers-say/article4651476/ On Thursday evening I went to Cabbagetown to cover a vigil for Nighisti Semret for the Globe. I have covered a few vigils now, sadly, and have come to have some idea of what to expect. There are always flowers and candles, for example. But normally there are also family members that become the centre of attention. Nighisti Semret was a refugee from Eritrea and lived here alone, working to send money back to her family now living in Uganda. A few of the first articles I read quoted neighbours saying she was quiet and kept to herself. I wondered whether the vigil would also be a quiet affair. 
It was not. It was, in fact, probably the most emotional vigil I have been to. There was a very audible outpouring of grief from many of the women - neighbours - who came to pay their respects. Some of them were also from Eritrea. They lamented the way she died, and the fact that she had had to live here alone for two years. They recognized themselves in her. 
One of my least favourite things to do as a photographer is stick my camera in the face of someone who is grieving. Yet as I tried to manoeuvre my way around the packed alleyway, people stepped aside to let me through. I probably said ‘sorry’ about 1,000 times - every time I felt I was in someone’s way. But I got the distinct sense that the mourners really wanted this vigil covered. And I was touched, as I often am, that they let me into their lives for a little while. 
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/victim-of-cabbagetown-stabbing-dreamed-of-bringing-kids-to-canada-coworkers-say/article4651476/ On Thursday evening I went to Cabbagetown to cover a vigil for Nighisti Semret for the Globe. I have covered a few vigils now, sadly, and have come to have some idea of what to expect. There are always flowers and candles, for example. But normally there are also family members that become the centre of attention. Nighisti Semret was a refugee from Eritrea and lived here alone, working to send money back to her family now living in Uganda. A few of the first articles I read quoted neighbours saying she was quiet and kept to herself. I wondered whether the vigil would also be a quiet affair. 
It was not. It was, in fact, probably the most emotional vigil I have been to. There was a very audible outpouring of grief from many of the women - neighbours - who came to pay their respects. Some of them were also from Eritrea. They lamented the way she died, and the fact that she had had to live here alone for two years. They recognized themselves in her. 
One of my least favourite things to do as a photographer is stick my camera in the face of someone who is grieving. Yet as I tried to manoeuvre my way around the packed alleyway, people stepped aside to let me through. I probably said ‘sorry’ about 1,000 times - every time I felt I was in someone’s way. But I got the distinct sense that the mourners really wanted this vigil covered. And I was touched, as I often am, that they let me into their lives for a little while. 
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/victim-of-cabbagetown-stabbing-dreamed-of-bringing-kids-to-canada-coworkers-say/article4651476/ On Thursday evening I went to Cabbagetown to cover a vigil for Nighisti Semret for the Globe. I have covered a few vigils now, sadly, and have come to have some idea of what to expect. There are always flowers and candles, for example. But normally there are also family members that become the centre of attention. Nighisti Semret was a refugee from Eritrea and lived here alone, working to send money back to her family now living in Uganda. A few of the first articles I read quoted neighbours saying she was quiet and kept to herself. I wondered whether the vigil would also be a quiet affair. 
It was not. It was, in fact, probably the most emotional vigil I have been to. There was a very audible outpouring of grief from many of the women - neighbours - who came to pay their respects. Some of them were also from Eritrea. They lamented the way she died, and the fact that she had had to live here alone for two years. They recognized themselves in her. 
One of my least favourite things to do as a photographer is stick my camera in the face of someone who is grieving. Yet as I tried to manoeuvre my way around the packed alleyway, people stepped aside to let me through. I probably said ‘sorry’ about 1,000 times - every time I felt I was in someone’s way. But I got the distinct sense that the mourners really wanted this vigil covered. And I was touched, as I often am, that they let me into their lives for a little while. 
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/victim-of-cabbagetown-stabbing-dreamed-of-bringing-kids-to-canada-coworkers-say/article4651476/

On Thursday evening I went to Cabbagetown to cover a vigil for Nighisti Semret for the Globe. I have covered a few vigils now, sadly, and have come to have some idea of what to expect. There are always flowers and candles, for example. But normally there are also family members that become the centre of attention. Nighisti Semret was a refugee from Eritrea and lived here alone, working to send money back to her family now living in Uganda. A few of the first articles I read quoted neighbours saying she was quiet and kept to herself. I wondered whether the vigil would also be a quiet affair. 

It was not. It was, in fact, probably the most emotional vigil I have been to. There was a very audible outpouring of grief from many of the women - neighbours - who came to pay their respects. Some of them were also from Eritrea. They lamented the way she died, and the fact that she had had to live here alone for two years. They recognized themselves in her. 

One of my least favourite things to do as a photographer is stick my camera in the face of someone who is grieving. Yet as I tried to manoeuvre my way around the packed alleyway, people stepped aside to let me through. I probably said ‘sorry’ about 1,000 times - every time I felt I was in someone’s way. But I got the distinct sense that the mourners really wanted this vigil covered. And I was touched, as I often am, that they let me into their lives for a little while. 

Link: 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/victim-of-cabbagetown-stabbing-dreamed-of-bringing-kids-to-canada-coworkers-say/article4651476/

Mark Johnson fulfilled a lifelong dream when he ran with the bulls in Pamplona this past July. He also raised $5400 for a school in India in the process. Johnson is pictured in his King Street office beside a poster from this year’s festival, August 9, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail) Mark Johnson fulfilled a lifelong dream when he ran with the bulls in Pamplona this past July. He also raised $5400 for a school in India in the process. Johnson is pictured in his King Street office beside a poster from this year’s festival, August 9, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

Mark Johnson fulfilled a lifelong dream when he ran with the bulls in Pamplona this past July. He also raised $5400 for a school in India in the process. Johnson is pictured in his King Street office beside a poster from this year’s festival, August 9, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/

Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

link: 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/

1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/

1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.

For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).

I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…

But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.

Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.

Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 

So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!

I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.

link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/

Shooting popsicles is a lot harder than one would think…
For one thing, your subjects are in perpetual danger of melting away on you. Studio-type stuff is not one of my biggest strengths as a photographer so there was a lot of pre-shoot practicing with regular old popsicles. 
I knew the Globe wanted something clean - a white background or the popsicles on ice. As far as the ice went, the main challenge for me was figuring out how to light the popsicles well without blowing out the details on the ice. 
I knew they wanted to feature the photo pretty prominently, which I think kicked my perfectionism into overdrive. I’ve found over the course of the summer that I’m often harder on myself than my editors are. 
Chris Nuttall-Smith, who made the popsicles and wrote the piece for the Globe, was equally picky. We kept at it for a couple hours until we had something we were both happy with and we felt would really make readers want to try these puppies. 
Best part - I got to try ALL the popsicles. And they were incredible. Hands down the best popsicles I’ve ever had. 
1. Left to right: Roasted plum, tarragon and yogurt swirl; raspberry and cream; cucumber, elderflower and tequila; blueberry and cardamom; and Pimm’s cup popsicles for grown-ups made by Chris Nuttall-Smith, July 19, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/food-and-wine/food-trends/boozy-and-delicious-try-these-grown-up-popsicles/article4439357/ Shooting popsicles is a lot harder than one would think…
For one thing, your subjects are in perpetual danger of melting away on you. Studio-type stuff is not one of my biggest strengths as a photographer so there was a lot of pre-shoot practicing with regular old popsicles. 
I knew the Globe wanted something clean - a white background or the popsicles on ice. As far as the ice went, the main challenge for me was figuring out how to light the popsicles well without blowing out the details on the ice. 
I knew they wanted to feature the photo pretty prominently, which I think kicked my perfectionism into overdrive. I’ve found over the course of the summer that I’m often harder on myself than my editors are. 
Chris Nuttall-Smith, who made the popsicles and wrote the piece for the Globe, was equally picky. We kept at it for a couple hours until we had something we were both happy with and we felt would really make readers want to try these puppies. 
Best part - I got to try ALL the popsicles. And they were incredible. Hands down the best popsicles I’ve ever had. 
1. Left to right: Roasted plum, tarragon and yogurt swirl; raspberry and cream; cucumber, elderflower and tequila; blueberry and cardamom; and Pimm’s cup popsicles for grown-ups made by Chris Nuttall-Smith, July 19, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/food-and-wine/food-trends/boozy-and-delicious-try-these-grown-up-popsicles/article4439357/ Shooting popsicles is a lot harder than one would think…
For one thing, your subjects are in perpetual danger of melting away on you. Studio-type stuff is not one of my biggest strengths as a photographer so there was a lot of pre-shoot practicing with regular old popsicles. 
I knew the Globe wanted something clean - a white background or the popsicles on ice. As far as the ice went, the main challenge for me was figuring out how to light the popsicles well without blowing out the details on the ice. 
I knew they wanted to feature the photo pretty prominently, which I think kicked my perfectionism into overdrive. I’ve found over the course of the summer that I’m often harder on myself than my editors are. 
Chris Nuttall-Smith, who made the popsicles and wrote the piece for the Globe, was equally picky. We kept at it for a couple hours until we had something we were both happy with and we felt would really make readers want to try these puppies. 
Best part - I got to try ALL the popsicles. And they were incredible. Hands down the best popsicles I’ve ever had. 
1. Left to right: Roasted plum, tarragon and yogurt swirl; raspberry and cream; cucumber, elderflower and tequila; blueberry and cardamom; and Pimm’s cup popsicles for grown-ups made by Chris Nuttall-Smith, July 19, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/food-and-wine/food-trends/boozy-and-delicious-try-these-grown-up-popsicles/article4439357/ Shooting popsicles is a lot harder than one would think…
For one thing, your subjects are in perpetual danger of melting away on you. Studio-type stuff is not one of my biggest strengths as a photographer so there was a lot of pre-shoot practicing with regular old popsicles. 
I knew the Globe wanted something clean - a white background or the popsicles on ice. As far as the ice went, the main challenge for me was figuring out how to light the popsicles well without blowing out the details on the ice. 
I knew they wanted to feature the photo pretty prominently, which I think kicked my perfectionism into overdrive. I’ve found over the course of the summer that I’m often harder on myself than my editors are. 
Chris Nuttall-Smith, who made the popsicles and wrote the piece for the Globe, was equally picky. We kept at it for a couple hours until we had something we were both happy with and we felt would really make readers want to try these puppies. 
Best part - I got to try ALL the popsicles. And they were incredible. Hands down the best popsicles I’ve ever had. 
1. Left to right: Roasted plum, tarragon and yogurt swirl; raspberry and cream; cucumber, elderflower and tequila; blueberry and cardamom; and Pimm’s cup popsicles for grown-ups made by Chris Nuttall-Smith, July 19, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/food-and-wine/food-trends/boozy-and-delicious-try-these-grown-up-popsicles/article4439357/ Shooting popsicles is a lot harder than one would think…
For one thing, your subjects are in perpetual danger of melting away on you. Studio-type stuff is not one of my biggest strengths as a photographer so there was a lot of pre-shoot practicing with regular old popsicles. 
I knew the Globe wanted something clean - a white background or the popsicles on ice. As far as the ice went, the main challenge for me was figuring out how to light the popsicles well without blowing out the details on the ice. 
I knew they wanted to feature the photo pretty prominently, which I think kicked my perfectionism into overdrive. I’ve found over the course of the summer that I’m often harder on myself than my editors are. 
Chris Nuttall-Smith, who made the popsicles and wrote the piece for the Globe, was equally picky. We kept at it for a couple hours until we had something we were both happy with and we felt would really make readers want to try these puppies. 
Best part - I got to try ALL the popsicles. And they were incredible. Hands down the best popsicles I’ve ever had. 
1. Left to right: Roasted plum, tarragon and yogurt swirl; raspberry and cream; cucumber, elderflower and tequila; blueberry and cardamom; and Pimm’s cup popsicles for grown-ups made by Chris Nuttall-Smith, July 19, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/food-and-wine/food-trends/boozy-and-delicious-try-these-grown-up-popsicles/article4439357/

Shooting popsicles is a lot harder than one would think…

For one thing, your subjects are in perpetual danger of melting away on you. Studio-type stuff is not one of my biggest strengths as a photographer so there was a lot of pre-shoot practicing with regular old popsicles. 

I knew the Globe wanted something clean - a white background or the popsicles on ice. As far as the ice went, the main challenge for me was figuring out how to light the popsicles well without blowing out the details on the ice. 

I knew they wanted to feature the photo pretty prominently, which I think kicked my perfectionism into overdrive. I’ve found over the course of the summer that I’m often harder on myself than my editors are. 

Chris Nuttall-Smith, who made the popsicles and wrote the piece for the Globe, was equally picky. We kept at it for a couple hours until we had something we were both happy with and we felt would really make readers want to try these puppies. 

Best part - I got to try ALL the popsicles. And they were incredible. Hands down the best popsicles I’ve ever had. 

1. Left to right: Roasted plum, tarragon and yogurt swirl; raspberry and cream; cucumber, elderflower and tequila; blueberry and cardamom; and Pimm’s cup popsicles for grown-ups made by Chris Nuttall-Smith, July 19, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/food-and-wine/food-trends/boozy-and-delicious-try-these-grown-up-popsicles/article4439357/

CEO of SOCAN, Eric Baptiste, said he was disappointed in Thursday’s Supreme Court of Canada ruling, which did away with some copyright fees on downloads, July 12, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/supreme-court-scraps-some-copyright-fees-on-downloads/article4409871/

  1. Camera: Nikon D3s
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/200th
  4. Focal Length: 26mm
1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/ 1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/

1. Robert Stadler winds down during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

2. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

3. Camille Greenstein (left), Simone Levine and Jessa Bissett perform a variety of poses in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

4. Instructor Lisa Novembre helps Janine Poon with a pose while Tanya Hammond goes through her routine during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

5. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

6. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

7. Instructor and studio owner David Robson leads the class in a prayer, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

8. Jessa Bissett stretches during the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, July 5, 2012. Students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

9. Students in the mysore yoga class at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors, July 5, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

10. Vince Smit practices mysore yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Centre on Yonge Street, , July 5, 2012. The students practice at their own pace and receive one-on-one help from instructors. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

link: 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/fitness/for-this-yoga-class-a-certain-level-of-brave-is-required/article4395072/