Steven Del Duca (right), the candidate chosen to represent the Liberals in September’s byelection in Vaughan, toured the Maple GO station with the provincial Minister of Transportation, Bob Chiarelli, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
Steven Del Duca, the candidate chosen to represent the Liberals in September’s byelection in Vaughan, toured the Maple GO station with the provincial Minister of Transportation, Bob Chiarelli, then stopped at St. Phillips bakery in his riding, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail) Steven Del Duca (right), the candidate chosen to represent the Liberals in September’s byelection in Vaughan, toured the Maple GO station with the provincial Minister of Transportation, Bob Chiarelli, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
Steven Del Duca, the candidate chosen to represent the Liberals in September’s byelection in Vaughan, toured the Maple GO station with the provincial Minister of Transportation, Bob Chiarelli, then stopped at St. Phillips bakery in his riding, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

Steven Del Duca (right), the candidate chosen to represent the Liberals in September’s byelection in Vaughan, toured the Maple GO station with the provincial Minister of Transportation, Bob Chiarelli, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

Steven Del Duca, the candidate chosen to represent the Liberals in September’s byelection in Vaughan, toured the Maple GO station with the provincial Minister of Transportation, Bob Chiarelli, then stopped at St. Phillips bakery in his riding, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

Jennifer Neubauer, 40, has been attending women’s-only cardiac rehabilitation sessions at Women’s College Hospital for nearly four months after having surgery to repair a hole in her heart, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/help-for-young-women-with-cardiac-issues/article4537217/ Jennifer Neubauer, 40, has been attending women’s-only cardiac rehabilitation sessions at Women’s College Hospital for nearly four months after having surgery to repair a hole in her heart, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/help-for-young-women-with-cardiac-issues/article4537217/ Jennifer Neubauer, 40, has been attending women’s-only cardiac rehabilitation sessions at Women’s College Hospital for nearly four months after having surgery to repair a hole in her heart, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/help-for-young-women-with-cardiac-issues/article4537217/ Jennifer Neubauer, 40, has been attending women’s-only cardiac rehabilitation sessions at Women’s College Hospital for nearly four months after having surgery to repair a hole in her heart, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/help-for-young-women-with-cardiac-issues/article4537217/

Jennifer Neubauer, 40, has been attending women’s-only cardiac rehabilitation sessions at Women’s College Hospital for nearly four months after having surgery to repair a hole in her heart, August 28, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)

Link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/help-for-young-women-with-cardiac-issues/article4537217/

Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…
Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/ Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…
Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/ Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…
Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/ Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…
Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/ Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…
Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/ Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…
Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/ Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…
Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/ Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…
Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/

Like I said, sometimes I can’t believe I get paid to do this stuff…

Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band performed to a full stadium at the Rogers Centre Friday night, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)

Link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/springsteen-gives-toronto-a-friday-night-to-remember/article4499015/

Homicide investigators, police, and officials from the Ministry of Transportation were on the railroad tracks Friday afternoon after a body was discovered near the Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre next to the tracks that morning, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/mans-body-found-in-east-end-toronto-park/article4497225/ Homicide investigators, police, and officials from the Ministry of Transportation were on the railroad tracks Friday afternoon after a body was discovered near the Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre next to the tracks that morning, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/mans-body-found-in-east-end-toronto-park/article4497225/ Homicide investigators, police, and officials from the Ministry of Transportation were on the railroad tracks Friday afternoon after a body was discovered near the Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre next to the tracks that morning, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/mans-body-found-in-east-end-toronto-park/article4497225/ Homicide investigators, police, and officials from the Ministry of Transportation were on the railroad tracks Friday afternoon after a body was discovered near the Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre next to the tracks that morning, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
Link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/mans-body-found-in-east-end-toronto-park/article4497225/

Homicide investigators, police, and officials from the Ministry of Transportation were on the railroad tracks Friday afternoon after a body was discovered near the Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre next to the tracks that morning, August 24, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)

Link: 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/mans-body-found-in-east-end-toronto-park/article4497225/

1. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe interacts with children outside her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 
2. Primary orangutan keeper Matt Berridge shows 45-year-old orangutan Puppe and her six-year-old son Budi an iPad from behind an enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. Orangutan Outreach donated the iPad under an initiative called Apps for Apes, in the hopes of providing more mental stimulation to the primates. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
3. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe rests in a corner of her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo, August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
4 & 5. Six-year-old orangutan Budi plays inside a hammock in his enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 1. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe interacts with children outside her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 
2. Primary orangutan keeper Matt Berridge shows 45-year-old orangutan Puppe and her six-year-old son Budi an iPad from behind an enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. Orangutan Outreach donated the iPad under an initiative called Apps for Apes, in the hopes of providing more mental stimulation to the primates. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
3. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe rests in a corner of her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo, August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
4 & 5. Six-year-old orangutan Budi plays inside a hammock in his enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 1. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe interacts with children outside her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 
2. Primary orangutan keeper Matt Berridge shows 45-year-old orangutan Puppe and her six-year-old son Budi an iPad from behind an enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. Orangutan Outreach donated the iPad under an initiative called Apps for Apes, in the hopes of providing more mental stimulation to the primates. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
3. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe rests in a corner of her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo, August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
4 & 5. Six-year-old orangutan Budi plays inside a hammock in his enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 1. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe interacts with children outside her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 
2. Primary orangutan keeper Matt Berridge shows 45-year-old orangutan Puppe and her six-year-old son Budi an iPad from behind an enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. Orangutan Outreach donated the iPad under an initiative called Apps for Apes, in the hopes of providing more mental stimulation to the primates. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
3. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe rests in a corner of her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo, August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
4 & 5. Six-year-old orangutan Budi plays inside a hammock in his enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 1. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe interacts with children outside her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 
2. Primary orangutan keeper Matt Berridge shows 45-year-old orangutan Puppe and her six-year-old son Budi an iPad from behind an enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. Orangutan Outreach donated the iPad under an initiative called Apps for Apes, in the hopes of providing more mental stimulation to the primates. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
3. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe rests in a corner of her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo, August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)
4 & 5. Six-year-old orangutan Budi plays inside a hammock in his enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)

1. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe interacts with children outside her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail) 

2. Primary orangutan keeper Matt Berridge shows 45-year-old orangutan Puppe and her six-year-old son Budi an iPad from behind an enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. Orangutan Outreach donated the iPad under an initiative called Apps for Apes, in the hopes of providing more mental stimulation to the primates. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)

3. Forty-five-year-old orangutan Puppe rests in a corner of her enclosure at the Toronto Zoo, August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)

4 & 5. Six-year-old orangutan Budi plays inside a hammock in his enclosure at the Toronto Zoo,  August 23, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)

Contortionist and hand balancer Sasha Pivaral performs at the official media launch for the 2012 Scotiabank Buskerfest in support of Epilepsy Toronto, August 22, 2012. (Galit Rodan/Globe and Mail)

  1. Camera: Nikon D3s
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/1250th
  4. Focal Length: 28mm
Neeraj Monga, executive vice-president of Veritas Investment Research Corp., co-authored a report alleging improper practices at IndiaBulls Group and advocating that shareholders sell their shares immediately, August 21, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
Story:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/international-business/asian-pacific-business/toronto-research-firm-rocks-clubby-world-of-india-inc/article4492168/ Neeraj Monga, executive vice-president of Veritas Investment Research Corp., co-authored a report alleging improper practices at IndiaBulls Group and advocating that shareholders sell their shares immediately, August 21, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
Story:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/international-business/asian-pacific-business/toronto-research-firm-rocks-clubby-world-of-india-inc/article4492168/ Neeraj Monga, executive vice-president of Veritas Investment Research Corp., co-authored a report alleging improper practices at IndiaBulls Group and advocating that shareholders sell their shares immediately, August 21, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
Story:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/international-business/asian-pacific-business/toronto-research-firm-rocks-clubby-world-of-india-inc/article4492168/ Neeraj Monga, executive vice-president of Veritas Investment Research Corp., co-authored a report alleging improper practices at IndiaBulls Group and advocating that shareholders sell their shares immediately, August 21, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
Story:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/international-business/asian-pacific-business/toronto-research-firm-rocks-clubby-world-of-india-inc/article4492168/

Neeraj Monga, executive vice-president of Veritas Investment Research Corp., co-authored a report alleging improper practices at IndiaBulls Group and advocating that shareholders sell their shares immediately, August 21, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

Story:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/international-business/asian-pacific-business/toronto-research-firm-rocks-clubby-world-of-india-inc/article4492168/

More Mudder
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail More Mudder
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail More Mudder
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail More Mudder
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail More Mudder
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail

More Mudder

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail

Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 
One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 
I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 
So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 
The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 
So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 
Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 
Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail

Tough Mudder, for those who haven’t heard (I hadn’t), is one of those crazy endurance/strength challenges - like Spartan Race, Warrior Dash, etc. - that seem to be all the rage these days. 

One of my editors, Dave Lucas, asked whether I’d shoot it when it came to Mount St. Louis Moonstone on August 18. There’d be ATV’s to shuffle photographers around, I was told. The only catch was it was on a Saturday morning and I’d have to be up around 6 a.m. to make it there by 9 a.m. the latest. 

I was down. Definitely down. What more could you want? The facial expressions of people who are just pushing themselves to their absolute limit are worth whatever minor inconveniences the photographer has to deal with. 

So I lost my tripod (left at the media tent, gone when I returned) and two lens hoods. So there were no ATVs. So I walked the course and shot for about eight hours with no food. I know it sounds like I’m complaining but honestly I didn’t care. I had SO MUCH FUN. One of my favourite shoots this summer by far. And yes, I walked the course and took my time. But even that gave me a minor sense of accomplishment and if you knew the last time I had been to the gym you would understand why. 

The thing about Tough Mudder that the organizers themselves stress is that it’s not a race. Finish times do count for something because there is apparently a toughest-of-the-tough-mudders-tough-mudder event that happens and that people qualify for based on their times. But still. Most people I saw just wanted to make it through. 

So the non-race also meant that there was this great team-building (I imagine military-style) camaraderie happening a la no-wo/man-left-behind that was really lovely to see. Lots of cheering others on, hoisting them up, holding their hands when they got scared, etc. etc. 

Quite frankly it kind of made ME want to do Tough Mudder…as soon as I can climb a hill without getting winded. Whenever that is. 

Ah, yes, the OTHER thing I learned - test new cards. Test, test, test. I had just bought a new 16GB Lexar Professional, which was one of two cards in my D3s. I had been reviewing photos throughout the day and hadn’t really noticed anything funny until near the end when little portions of some of the photos were blinking. This was also the card I had shot ALL of my video on. Needless to say the entire card was corrupt. So disappointing. I spent a while downloading programs to try to repair the photos but no luck. I got quotes from data recovery companies that were close to $2000 and neither I nor the Globe was willing to pay anywhere close to that. The photos had to be in the next day and, luckily, the other card in my D3s as well as the card in my d700 were fine. I eventually reached someone at Lexar who said to send the card in and that they would try their hardest to recover whatever they could. I still do want those photos…

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail

1. Sylvia Frank, the curator of a new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox talks to media about the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. This display case shows prosthetics and materials used on the character Nightcrawler, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5 & 6. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail) 1. Sylvia Frank, the curator of a new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox talks to media about the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. This display case shows prosthetics and materials used on the character Nightcrawler, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5 & 6. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail) 1. Sylvia Frank, the curator of a new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox talks to media about the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. This display case shows prosthetics and materials used on the character Nightcrawler, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5 & 6. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail) 1. Sylvia Frank, the curator of a new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox talks to media about the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. This display case shows prosthetics and materials used on the character Nightcrawler, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5 & 6. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail) 1. Sylvia Frank, the curator of a new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox talks to media about the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. This display case shows prosthetics and materials used on the character Nightcrawler, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5 & 6. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail) 1. Sylvia Frank, the curator of a new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox talks to media about the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. This display case shows prosthetics and materials used on the character Nightcrawler, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5 & 6. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

1. Sylvia Frank, the curator of a new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox talks to media about the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

2. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

3. This display case shows prosthetics and materials used on the character Nightcrawler, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

4. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

5 & 6. A new exhibit at TIFF Bell Lightbox features the work of famed Canadian special effects artist Gordon Smith, who worked on the first two X-Men movies, among many others, August 15, 2012. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)