Well this totally messes up the only half messed up chronological order I have going on here but I shot this yesterday and love it and want to share. 

Yesterday was my first official day of freelance after the end of my summer internship at the Globe and Mail.

One of the editors was kind enough to suggest me when a friend of hers, Doug Sturgeon of Eclipse Photography, needed a second shooter for a wedding on Saturday. 

There is a series of photos like this but I think this is my favourite. Shot at ISO 6400 (thank you D3s) inside Graydon Hall, where the reception was held. There was this beautiful Caravaggio-esque lighting but it wasn’t even really apparent until I saw it on my LCD screen. The red velvet couch and adorable toddler in a white dress was compelling enough on its own. 

The little girl’s name is Matilda Ellis. She loved the camera and was lying there trying to take iPhone photos of herself while her older sister helped.

Image is copyright Galit Rodan/Doug Sturgeon/Eclipse Photography. 

For more of Doug’s work, check out http://www.eclipsephotography.com/

  1. Camera: Nikon D3s
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/50th
  4. Focal Length: 150mm

Actor Will Ferrell claps tentatively and grimaces as Mayor Rob Ford receives a few boos upon his entrance to the Hockey Hall of Fame. Ferrell and co-star Zach Galifianakis were joined by Ford at the Hockey Hall of Fame while promoting their new movie The Campaign, July 30, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

  1. Camera: Nikon D3s
  2. Aperture: f/4
  3. Exposure: 1/100th
  4. Focal Length: 26mm
I was on a photo walk through Kensington Market back at the end of June when I saw this really awesome vintage-looking green table outside a shop on Augusta I’d never seen before. 
I had been looking for something just like it for the kitchen and went in to find out if it was for sale. 
It wasn’t, and the shop turned out to sell jewelry, not furniture. 
Still, I could tell within seconds that it was the kind of jewelry I love - eclectic, whimsical, one-of-a-kind pieces. 
And as I got talking to shop owner Brittany Hopkins, she noticed that I was wearing a necklace she had made. It was a total coincidence - I had gotten it at a completely different store. 
Brittany’s a total sweetheart and her company/shop Anice, is amazing. One of her grandmothers got her started by giving her old jewelry she wasn’t wearing anymore and Brittany would take it apart and give it a modern twist. Last I checked her other grandmother was getting in on the action, and had convinced her friends in her bridge club to donate some jewelry too! 
I walked out with three necklaces (!) and, best of all, some photos. 
You guys should check her out on facebook at 
http://www.facebook.com/AniceJewelBoutique I was on a photo walk through Kensington Market back at the end of June when I saw this really awesome vintage-looking green table outside a shop on Augusta I’d never seen before. 
I had been looking for something just like it for the kitchen and went in to find out if it was for sale. 
It wasn’t, and the shop turned out to sell jewelry, not furniture. 
Still, I could tell within seconds that it was the kind of jewelry I love - eclectic, whimsical, one-of-a-kind pieces. 
And as I got talking to shop owner Brittany Hopkins, she noticed that I was wearing a necklace she had made. It was a total coincidence - I had gotten it at a completely different store. 
Brittany’s a total sweetheart and her company/shop Anice, is amazing. One of her grandmothers got her started by giving her old jewelry she wasn’t wearing anymore and Brittany would take it apart and give it a modern twist. Last I checked her other grandmother was getting in on the action, and had convinced her friends in her bridge club to donate some jewelry too! 
I walked out with three necklaces (!) and, best of all, some photos. 
You guys should check her out on facebook at 
http://www.facebook.com/AniceJewelBoutique I was on a photo walk through Kensington Market back at the end of June when I saw this really awesome vintage-looking green table outside a shop on Augusta I’d never seen before. 
I had been looking for something just like it for the kitchen and went in to find out if it was for sale. 
It wasn’t, and the shop turned out to sell jewelry, not furniture. 
Still, I could tell within seconds that it was the kind of jewelry I love - eclectic, whimsical, one-of-a-kind pieces. 
And as I got talking to shop owner Brittany Hopkins, she noticed that I was wearing a necklace she had made. It was a total coincidence - I had gotten it at a completely different store. 
Brittany’s a total sweetheart and her company/shop Anice, is amazing. One of her grandmothers got her started by giving her old jewelry she wasn’t wearing anymore and Brittany would take it apart and give it a modern twist. Last I checked her other grandmother was getting in on the action, and had convinced her friends in her bridge club to donate some jewelry too! 
I walked out with three necklaces (!) and, best of all, some photos. 
You guys should check her out on facebook at 
http://www.facebook.com/AniceJewelBoutique I was on a photo walk through Kensington Market back at the end of June when I saw this really awesome vintage-looking green table outside a shop on Augusta I’d never seen before. 
I had been looking for something just like it for the kitchen and went in to find out if it was for sale. 
It wasn’t, and the shop turned out to sell jewelry, not furniture. 
Still, I could tell within seconds that it was the kind of jewelry I love - eclectic, whimsical, one-of-a-kind pieces. 
And as I got talking to shop owner Brittany Hopkins, she noticed that I was wearing a necklace she had made. It was a total coincidence - I had gotten it at a completely different store. 
Brittany’s a total sweetheart and her company/shop Anice, is amazing. One of her grandmothers got her started by giving her old jewelry she wasn’t wearing anymore and Brittany would take it apart and give it a modern twist. Last I checked her other grandmother was getting in on the action, and had convinced her friends in her bridge club to donate some jewelry too! 
I walked out with three necklaces (!) and, best of all, some photos. 
You guys should check her out on facebook at 
http://www.facebook.com/AniceJewelBoutique

I was on a photo walk through Kensington Market back at the end of June when I saw this really awesome vintage-looking green table outside a shop on Augusta I’d never seen before. 

I had been looking for something just like it for the kitchen and went in to find out if it was for sale. 

It wasn’t, and the shop turned out to sell jewelry, not furniture. 

Still, I could tell within seconds that it was the kind of jewelry I love - eclectic, whimsical, one-of-a-kind pieces. 

And as I got talking to shop owner Brittany Hopkins, she noticed that I was wearing a necklace she had made. It was a total coincidence - I had gotten it at a completely different store. 

Brittany’s a total sweetheart and her company/shop Anice, is amazing. One of her grandmothers got her started by giving her old jewelry she wasn’t wearing anymore and Brittany would take it apart and give it a modern twist. Last I checked her other grandmother was getting in on the action, and had convinced her friends in her bridge club to donate some jewelry too! 

I walked out with three necklaces (!) and, best of all, some photos. 

You guys should check her out on facebook at 

http://www.facebook.com/AniceJewelBoutique

Flight of the pigeons on Jameson Ave, June 15, 2012. 

  1. Camera: Nikon D3s
  2. Aperture: f/6.3
  3. Exposure: 1/30th
  4. Focal Length: 60mm
1. Harry Mielke, antiques dealer, at the Aberfoyle antique market, June 15, 2012. Copyright Galit Rodan
2. An antiques dealer took a nap at his booth at the Aberfoyle antique market, June 15, 2012. Copyright Galit Rodan. 1. Harry Mielke, antiques dealer, at the Aberfoyle antique market, June 15, 2012. Copyright Galit Rodan
2. An antiques dealer took a nap at his booth at the Aberfoyle antique market, June 15, 2012. Copyright Galit Rodan.

1. Harry Mielke, antiques dealer, at the Aberfoyle antique market, June 15, 2012. Copyright Galit Rodan

2. An antiques dealer took a nap at his booth at the Aberfoyle antique market, June 15, 2012. Copyright Galit Rodan.

A woman looks down from her balcony on Jameson Avenue after a rainstorm, July 15, 2012. Copyright Galit Rodan.

  1. Camera: Nikon D3s
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/125th
  4. Focal Length: 102mm
Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/ Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/ Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/ Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/ Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/ Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/ Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/ Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/ Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/

Guy and Kathy Johnstone acquired legendary aviator Orville Wright’s boat, Kittyhawk, after Kathy’s father Wilfred France passed away and have since refurbished it, August 3, 2012. France ran a hotel in Franceville where Orville used to vacation and looked after the boat after Wright died, eventually purchasing it in 1952. (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/kittyhawk-boat-is-canadas-link-to-aviation-pioneer-orville-wright/article4464392/

Shireen Ahmed hopes that open communication, sports and positive role models will help ease daughter Rumaysa Khan’s transition to teenagehood over the coming years. Khan is athletic and plays soccer but also loves trying on her mother’s shoes, August 2, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/conditions/parents-can-help-with-their-girls-depression/article4461132/ Shireen Ahmed hopes that open communication, sports and positive role models will help ease daughter Rumaysa Khan’s transition to teenagehood over the coming years. Khan is athletic and plays soccer but also loves trying on her mother’s shoes, August 2, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/conditions/parents-can-help-with-their-girls-depression/article4461132/ Shireen Ahmed hopes that open communication, sports and positive role models will help ease daughter Rumaysa Khan’s transition to teenagehood over the coming years. Khan is athletic and plays soccer but also loves trying on her mother’s shoes, August 2, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/conditions/parents-can-help-with-their-girls-depression/article4461132/ Shireen Ahmed hopes that open communication, sports and positive role models will help ease daughter Rumaysa Khan’s transition to teenagehood over the coming years. Khan is athletic and plays soccer but also loves trying on her mother’s shoes, August 2, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/conditions/parents-can-help-with-their-girls-depression/article4461132/

Shireen Ahmed hopes that open communication, sports and positive role models will help ease daughter Rumaysa Khan’s transition to teenagehood over the coming years. Khan is athletic and plays soccer but also loves trying on her mother’s shoes, August 2, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/conditions/parents-can-help-with-their-girls-depression/article4461132/

Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/ Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
link: 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/

Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair attends an editorial board meeting at the Globe and Mail to discuss the recent spate of gun crime in the city, July 31, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

link: 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/police-alone-cant-stop-gangs-toronto-chief-bill-blair-says/article4453547/

1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/ 1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)
When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.
For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).
I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…
But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.
Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.
Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 
So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!
I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.
link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/

1. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman prepares to pull a frame from a hive as beekeeper and son William Roman follows closely behind with  a smoker, used to clear the hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

2. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb with capped brood at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

3. Bees crawl around a sheet of honeycomb at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

4. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

5. Master beekeeper Eugene Roman examines a frame from a hive at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

6. Niagara College summer coop students Audrey Friendship (left) and Benjamin Brown (right) as well as Vineyard Manager Luke Orwinski (centre) put capped frames through an uncapper before placing them in honey extractors, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

7. Niagara College summer coop student Audrey Friendship opens a honey extractor, revealing the frames inside, July 25, 2012 at Rosewood Estates’ 21st Vineyard and Honey Processing Location in Jordan, Ontario.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

8. Harvested wildflower honey and various wines for sale in honeycomb-shaped shelves at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

9. ”Queen bee” Renata Roman pours honey in a back room at Rosewood Estates Winery in Beamsville, July 25, 2012.  (Galit Rodan/The Globe and Mail)

When Randy Velocci, one of my editors, sent me an email assigning me to shoot a photo essay on a honey harvest, I kept my mouth shut about my fear of bees.

For one thing, spending the greater portion of a day in the picturesque little town of Jordan, Ontario, away from the suffocating humidity of the city, sounded like a good thing. For another, the chance to actually have multiple photos published was exciting. For another, I’m an intern. Saying no is not an option (and I wouldn’t have even if it were).

I know my fear of bees is totally irrational. I’ve been stung and bitten by all sorts of other things - mosquitos, black flies, spiders, stinging nettles, dogs, squirrels…

But I’d never been stung by a bee. I don’t know why that particular insect provoked such fear in my heart but I was one of those people who flailed around in a panic and ran away whenever they got too close.

Part of me has always feared I might be allergic. I mean, who knows, right? It’s been at least a decade since my last allergy test. So death by bee always seemed like a terrifying, if probably unlikely (though possible), scenario.

Aaaaaanyway, I sucked it up and went along with reporter Tamara Baluja. I had a feeling this was going to be my chance to overcome. When I’m shooting I often get so focused on getting my shots that every other emotion goes away. Sometimes I get a bit of tunnel vision. I would probably be a terrible (and short-lived) war photographer. 

So, with the exception of a few seconds outside near the hives when I thought a bee had flown up into my mask and a few seconds inside when I discovered a drowsy bee clinging to the top of my camera about a centimeter away from my eyeball, I was fine. No panic. Just fun and concentration and sweat. Shooting through a helmet/netting is kinda tough. You can’t get the viewfinder right up to your eye so the edges of the frame get kind of lost in a vignette and sometimes you aren’t sure if you’re hitting your focus. But it all worked out. And neither of us got stung!

I felt more confident around bees after that. I started thinking I’d probably just never be stung. Classic, though. A couple weeks later, on a day I was shooting a 16-kilometre obstacle course, I got stung for the first time as I was moving from a standing to a crouching position. Right in the back of the knee. It really wasn’t that bad.

link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/gold-rush-harvesting-honey-on-a-wild-weather-schedule/article4457546/