And a couple more from Waka Flocka Flame… And a couple more from Waka Flocka Flame…

And a couple more from Waka Flocka Flame…

So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 
Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 
Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.
Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 
I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 
Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 
All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star

So the Toronto Star sent me to cover Waka Flocka Flame at Kool Haus Wednesday night. First of all, I’ve never been to Kool Haus. I wasn’t familiar with Waka Flocka (shocking, I know). My call time was 9:15 and I sort of lost track of time during the day so by 8:30 I was rushing to get myself ready. 

Anyway, I was woefully unprepared. Not gear-wise, thankfully, but I stuck out like a sore thumb. And had no earplugs. I knew it was the standard three songs from the pit, no flash, but I had no idea how close the pit at Kool Haus was to the stage. So it turned out I was going to be doing the up-the-performer’s-nose shot from like a foot in front of the stage. Being 5”2 also does not help that angle. But back to the earplugs. Honestly the bass coming from those speakers felt like it could jump-start a dead person’s heart. I know I’m being a super lame white girl here but THAT IS WHAT IT FELT LIKE. I asked a couple security guys if they had spare earplugs but no luck. Eventually one of them found a pair still in their little baggie on the ground. And bless that guy because I think he saved me a week’s worth of tinnitus at least. Possibly a lifetime’s. 

Everything was pushed back so I got to watch/photograph part of Reema Major’s set. And  I think I had more fun shooting her. I also just found out she’s 17. Seventeen!! When I was 17 I was curled up in my mom’s chair watching Dawson’s Creek at 9:30 p.m. on a weeknight. So yes, impressive.

Waka Flocka Flame was a bit tougher. And I think it was mostly because they were changing the lights around more. It honestly felt like the exposure changes were happening every 20 seconds and trying to stay on top of those while also capturing moments was challenging. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Shutter priority maybe? But even spot metering with lighting like that is tough. 

I think we actually got pulled out of the pit before the three songs were up because Waka Flocka Flame decided to walk through the pit and really get in with the audience and then security was everywhere and it seemed like his handlers felt like maybe they were losing control of him a bit. In the midst of all this we were ushered away but I’m pretty sure it was in the middle of a song. 

Regardless, a fun shoot. And with the extra time I got to look around for moments happening offstage. And work! I still get excited every time I get an assignment. 

All photos Copyright Galit Rodan/Toronto Star

And a little series from the top of the Rockefeller Center And a little series from the top of the Rockefeller Center And a little series from the top of the Rockefeller Center And a little series from the top of the Rockefeller Center And a little series from the top of the Rockefeller Center And a little series from the top of the Rockefeller Center And a little series from the top of the Rockefeller Center

And a little series from the top of the Rockefeller Center

Williamsburg, Brooklyn

  1. Camera: Nikon D3s
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/1600th
  4. Focal Length: 35mm
I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP.  I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 
I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP. 

I spent a few days in New York City after the Eddie Adams workshop and it honestly blew my mind. To the extent that Toronto somehow felt small upon my return. 

I really wish I’d shot more but I spent one entire day in bed with some sort of awful cold and the next few recuperating and taking it easy. I did manage to do some walking around with one camera body and a 17-35. I need to go back. Like ASAP. 

#newyork #streetphotography (Taken with Instagram)

#newyork #streetphotography (Taken with Instagram)

Scott Allen at the bonfire Sunday night #EAWXXV #EddieAdams

  1. Camera: Nikon D3s
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/100th
  4. Focal Length: 35mm

Left Eddie Adams late today after staying up all night. Headed for NYC. Pulled off the road to nap from 4-5:30. Went to Redendo’s Pizza in Goshen for a slice. #photojournalism #america #pizzaparlor (Taken with Instagram)

1. (Right to left) Graeme MacDonald, Jerome Pamintuan and Soroush Safavinik of team Bombard tweak their app during the final few hours of the challenge. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
2. Jerome Pamintuan and Soroush Safavinik of team Bombard tweak their app during the final few hours of the challenge. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
3. Couple Thomas Humphreys and Sunny Du of team Aardvark support each other through the final few hours of the Great Canadian Appathon, Sunday, September 30, 2012. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/students-go-a-weekend-without-sleep-for-the-great-canadian-appathon/article4578647/ 1. (Right to left) Graeme MacDonald, Jerome Pamintuan and Soroush Safavinik of team Bombard tweak their app during the final few hours of the challenge. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
2. Jerome Pamintuan and Soroush Safavinik of team Bombard tweak their app during the final few hours of the challenge. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
3. Couple Thomas Humphreys and Sunny Du of team Aardvark support each other through the final few hours of the Great Canadian Appathon, Sunday, September 30, 2012. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/students-go-a-weekend-without-sleep-for-the-great-canadian-appathon/article4578647/ 1. (Right to left) Graeme MacDonald, Jerome Pamintuan and Soroush Safavinik of team Bombard tweak their app during the final few hours of the challenge. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
2. Jerome Pamintuan and Soroush Safavinik of team Bombard tweak their app during the final few hours of the challenge. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
3. Couple Thomas Humphreys and Sunny Du of team Aardvark support each other through the final few hours of the Great Canadian Appathon, Sunday, September 30, 2012. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)
Link:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/students-go-a-weekend-without-sleep-for-the-great-canadian-appathon/article4578647/

1. (Right to left) Graeme MacDonald, Jerome Pamintuan and Soroush Safavinik of team Bombard tweak their app during the final few hours of the challenge. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)

2. Jerome Pamintuan and Soroush Safavinik of team Bombard tweak their app during the final few hours of the challenge. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)

3. Couple Thomas Humphreys and Sunny Du of team Aardvark support each other through the final few hours of the Great Canadian Appathon, Sunday, September 30, 2012. Teams of program developers and designers spent the weekend at Ryerson University’s Digital Media Zone during the Great Canadian Appathon, a 48-hour challenge open to post-secondary students throughout the country. (Galit Rodan for The Globe and Mail)

Link:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/students-go-a-weekend-without-sleep-for-the-great-canadian-appathon/article4578647/